NewsKeeping you up to date with Project Seagrass news and views with a mixture of field notes and commentary on seagrass and marine conservation topics. Stay up to date by subscribing to our newsletter here.

Awareness
October 11, 2022

Understanding Wales past oceans to inspire their biodiverse future

Dr Richard Unsworth, Project Seagrass and Swansea University The seas around Wales have so much potential. They offer rich biodiversity hidden within productive lush habitats such as kelp forests, salt marshes and seagrass meadows. Life in these waters can be so ingenious that it bioengineers its own environment. Out of seemingly nothing, reefs and seagrass appear that can protect our coast and filter our water. Deepwater horse mussels that bring barren depths to life. All these habitats are teaming with life. We have Mearl beds too that are like the coral reefs of the Atlantic. We have whales, we have…
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Blogs
October 4, 2022

Running Out of Time

This Thursday 6th October, Project Seagrass will be taking part in the Running Out of Time climate relay. The relay runs from COP26 to COP27 - from Glasgow, Scotland all the way to Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. It takes place over 38 days across 18 countries to carry a relay baton containing a message from young people to the decision makers at COP27. You can read the message here. Project Seagrass are proud to be taking part in the relay across South Wales from our research facilities in Swansea to our HQ in Bridgend. We will be carrying our own letter…
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Guest Blog
August 25, 2022

Official words for seagrass in Seychellois Creole

An outreach initiative to entice local ownership of the protection of seagrass meadows Seychelles is not the only country or territory where seagrass has had to play catch up with other types of coastal wetlands and other marine ecosystems. To most Seychellois, up until recently, anything plant-like which is green and comes from the sea has been categorised as gomon; be it seaweed or seagrass. Formally, seagrass has not had a name or term to define it in the country’s native language, Seychellois Creole. Matthew Morgan The team behind the Coastal Wetlands and Climate Change project, whose main objective was…
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Press Release
August 4, 2022

Why saving the world’s seagrass is part of the most important to-do list in the history of humankind

“The downward trajectory of the world's seagrass meadows must be reversed if we are to fight the planetary crisis” say leading seagrass scientists. School of fish in the seagrass, Komodo, Indonesia. (Credit: Matt Curnock / Ocean Image Bank) The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals have recently been described as “the most important to-do list in the history of humankind”. Scientists from Project Seagrass and Swansea University have this week published a unique review that demonstrates how this “To-Do List” of Sustainable Development Goals provides a blueprint for achieving the net recovery of seagrass ecosystems. Conserving and restoring seagrass meadows contributes…
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